July 23, 2014
A young girl stands on her family’s fence in the Pamirs of Tajikistan. Ramadan 2012

A young girl stands on her family’s fence in the Pamirs of Tajikistan. Ramadan 2012

July 22, 2014
Speaking to the neighbors during an evening stroll through the gardens along the edge of the Pamirs, before breaking fast for Ramadan.
In Tajikistan, you can encounter villages predominately of women and children, as many men are working out of the country such as in Russia. I’m not sure if there many other places I’ve felt so safe and welcomed, by all.
Earlier in the day, this older woman had insisted on giving me a bath. As I’m standing in the mud packed wash room, modestly with all my undergarments on, she insists I take EVERYTHING off and get in the tub. I’m always up for an adventure and experience and this surely was…and will never be forgotten.
Later the women, children, and I would dance in a room together and that evening I would share a room with her and the youngest boy in this photo.

Speaking to the neighbors during an evening stroll through the gardens along the edge of the Pamirs, before breaking fast for Ramadan.

In Tajikistan, you can encounter villages predominately of women and children, as many men are working out of the country such as in Russia. I’m not sure if there many other places I’ve felt so safe and welcomed, by all.

Earlier in the day, this older woman had insisted on giving me a bath. As I’m standing in the mud packed wash room, modestly with all my undergarments on, she insists I take EVERYTHING off and get in the tub. I’m always up for an adventure and experience and this surely was…and will never be forgotten.

Later the women, children, and I would dance in a room together and that evening I would share a room with her and the youngest boy in this photo.

July 21, 2014
"Gonona kathi", the Bengali name for the ancient tally counting system, being used on a ship carrying cargo along the Jamuna River in Bangladesh.
A tally (or tally stick) was an ancient memory aid device used to record and document numbers, quantities, or even messages. Tally sticks first appear as animal bones carved with notches, in the Upper Paleolithic; a notable example is the Ishango Bone. Historical reference is made by Pliny the Elder (AD 23-79) about the best wood to use for tallies, and by Marco Polo (1254-1324) who mentions the use of the tally in China. Tallies have been used for numerous purposes such as messaging and scheduling, and especically in financial and legal transactions, the the point of being currency.
Principally there are two different kinds of tally sticks, the single and split tally. A common form of the same kind of primitive counting device is seen in various kinds of prayer beads.

"Gonona kathi", the Bengali name for the ancient tally counting system, being used on a ship carrying cargo along the Jamuna River in Bangladesh.

A tally (or tally stick) was an ancient memory aid device used to record and document numbers, quantities, or even messages. Tally sticks first appear as animal bones carved with notches, in the Upper Paleolithic; a notable example is the Ishango Bone. Historical reference is made by Pliny the Elder (AD 23-79) about the best wood to use for tallies, and by Marco Polo (1254-1324) who mentions the use of the tally in China. Tallies have been used for numerous purposes such as messaging and scheduling, and especically in financial and legal transactions, the the point of being currency.

Principally there are two different kinds of tally sticks, the single and split tally. A common form of the same kind of primitive counting device is seen in various kinds of prayer beads.

July 16, 2014
Men load fertilizer along the banks of the Jamuna River in Bangladesh. March 2014
The Jamuna river is a braided river and is highly susceptible to channel migration and avulsion. Every rainy season, the sandbars are destroyed and new ones are formed. This makes navigating very difficult as the route will change from year to year. It takes about 3 days for a ship to navigate from Chittagong to the port of Baghabari Ghat.
 

Men load fertilizer along the banks of the Jamuna River in Bangladesh. March 2014

The Jamuna river is a braided river and is highly susceptible to channel migration and avulsion. Every rainy season, the sandbars are destroyed and new ones are formed. This makes navigating very difficult as the route will change from year to year. It takes about 3 days for a ship to navigate from Chittagong to the port of Baghabari Ghat.

 

June 24, 2014
Zorna stands next to her husband in a slum camp developed for garment workers near Dhaka, Bangladesh. February 2014
This young woman is approximately 25 years old and has resided here for the last 10 years. The young couple has one son together that lives with extended family in their hometown of Jamalpur-Sherpur. I was told that the two must reside in separate quarters of the camp, as men and women are separated to prevent problems from arising.
This portrait received an Honorable Mention from the 2014 Professional Women Photographers Open Call.

Zorna stands next to her husband in a slum camp developed for garment workers near Dhaka, Bangladesh. February 2014

This young woman is approximately 25 years old and has resided here for the last 10 years. The young couple has one son together that lives with extended family in their hometown of Jamalpur-Sherpur. I was told that the two must reside in separate quarters of the camp, as men and women are separated to prevent problems from arising.

This portrait received an Honorable Mention from the 2014 Professional Women Photographers Open Call.

June 21, 2014
A 10 year old Bangladeshi girl holds the hand of her little brother in the slums that were built to house the workers and their families of a garment factory near Dhaka, Bangladesh.
These two, with their 2 older sisters and parents have resided in this worker camp for over 5 years. Children will become adults within these squalor conditions, with no educational facilities, to break the cycle of poverty.
More than likely, these two will eventually become employees of the factory, marry a fellow employ, and spend the remaining of their working years here. Generally, garment workers can’t physically work past the age of 40 because the detrimental effects the work has on them.
It’s not only in Bangladesh that people live in conditions like this, and unsafe factory conditions. It’s a worldwide problem. Bangladesh currently has a lot of organizations, volunteers, and NGOs trying to make it better and to help. Some worker camps are starting to see some sort of educational and health facilities. Hopefully, over time and with awareness, we’ll see positive changes.
I want to thank all of my new followers, it really means a lot and encourages me to continue this work I’m passionate about. This work is all self-funded but it’s the love for humanity that keeps me going. Again, so honored and gracious for the new 500 followers! You can follow me at www.facebook.com/adventurer.photographer to keep up to date with future projects and shenanigans. 
Let’s all love one another, folks!

A 10 year old Bangladeshi girl holds the hand of her little brother in the slums that were built to house the workers and their families of a garment factory near Dhaka, Bangladesh.

These two, with their 2 older sisters and parents have resided in this worker camp for over 5 years. Children will become adults within these squalor conditions, with no educational facilities, to break the cycle of poverty.

More than likely, these two will eventually become employees of the factory, marry a fellow employ, and spend the remaining of their working years here. Generally, garment workers can’t physically work past the age of 40 because the detrimental effects the work has on them.

It’s not only in Bangladesh that people live in conditions like this, and unsafe factory conditions. It’s a worldwide problem. Bangladesh currently has a lot of organizations, volunteers, and NGOs trying to make it better and to help. Some worker camps are starting to see some sort of educational and health facilities. Hopefully, over time and with awareness, we’ll see positive changes.

I want to thank all of my new followers, it really means a lot and encourages me to continue this work I’m passionate about. This work is all self-funded but it’s the love for humanity that keeps me going. Again, so honored and gracious for the new 500 followers! You can follow me at www.facebook.com/adventurer.photographer to keep up to date with future projects and shenanigans. 

Let’s all love one another, folks!

May 10, 2014
Rokiabezom states she is approximately 30 years of age and has been separated from her husband and one son for over 7 years, as she is living and working at a garment factory near Dhaka, Bangladesh. 
There is something about this woman and her sari that reminds me of my own mother 30 years ago. As a child in the United States, my mother used to have a robe she wore around the house of almost an identical print and I remember pulling on it and wrapping myself up in it.
Race, nationality, religion aside…this woman’s face speaks for the millions of women around the world that make personal sacrifices every moment of their life, in hopes to provide for their family.
Happy Mother’s Day!

Rokiabezom states she is approximately 30 years of age and has been separated from her husband and one son for over 7 years, as she is living and working at a garment factory near Dhaka, Bangladesh. 

There is something about this woman and her sari that reminds me of my own mother 30 years ago. As a child in the United States, my mother used to have a robe she wore around the house of almost an identical print and I remember pulling on it and wrapping myself up in it.

Race, nationality, religion aside…this woman’s face speaks for the millions of women around the world that make personal sacrifices every moment of their life, in hopes to provide for their family.

Happy Mother’s Day!

May 6, 2014
Nazma, 25 years old, has resided in the slums deemed living quarters for garment laborers near Dhaka, Bangladesh. She has been here for over 6 years without her husband and one child.
April 24th marked the one year anniversary of the deadly Rana Plaza collapse.

Nazma, 25 years old, has resided in the slums deemed living quarters for garment laborers near Dhaka, Bangladesh. She has been here for over 6 years without her husband and one child.

April 24th marked the one year anniversary of the deadly Rana Plaza collapse.

May 4, 2014
Muhammed Abdullah, a young age between 22-24 has resided at this camp built for garment workers of Gazipur, Bangladesh for over 18 years.
He’s married with one son and they reside at his hometown of Jamalpur-Sherpur.
Too often garment laborers have grown up within these slums that have been built to house the workers. 

Muhammed Abdullah, a young age between 22-24 has resided at this camp built for garment workers of Gazipur, Bangladesh for over 18 years.

He’s married with one son and they reside at his hometown of Jamalpur-Sherpur.

Too often garment laborers have grown up within these slums that have been built to house the workers. 

April 30, 2014
Daughter of garment workers, hangs laundry to dry, within the slum walls of a work camp near Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Although she is not employed by the factory, she will take on household chores in the work camp that is a few meters away from the factory building.

Daughter of garment workers, hangs laundry to dry, within the slum walls of a work camp near Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Although she is not employed by the factory, she will take on household chores in the work camp that is a few meters away from the factory building.

April 29, 2014
Kobirhossion is 32 years old, married, and has 3 children. Originally from Commilla, Bangladesh, he has lived at this garment worker’s camp for over 12 years separated from his family. 
This garment factory produces tee shirts for export and is located north of Dhaka. Last week, the 24th, marked the year anniversary of the Rana Plaza collapse where an estimated 1, 129 workers lost their lives and 2, 515 were injured. 
These are the people that clothe the world

Kobirhossion is 32 years old, married, and has 3 children. Originally from Commilla, Bangladesh, he has lived at this garment worker’s camp for over 12 years separated from his family. 

This garment factory produces tee shirts for export and is located north of Dhaka. Last week, the 24th, marked the year anniversary of the Rana Plaza collapse where an estimated 1, 129 workers lost their lives and 2, 515 were injured. 

These are the people that clothe the world

April 19, 2014
Along the southern banks of Namucuo (the highest alpine lake in the world) a storm is coming in from the north. 
A young Tibetan girl collects dried yak dung for fuel of the stove in the nomad tent. This particular camp was moving to a new location as winter was approaching, in September.

Along the southern banks of Namucuo (the highest alpine lake in the world) a storm is coming in from the north. 

A young Tibetan girl collects dried yak dung for fuel of the stove in the nomad tent. This particular camp was moving to a new location as winter was approaching, in September.

April 17, 2014
Two sisters sit under a single, bare, fluorescent bulb that lights the room the family of 12 shares for living, eating, and sleeping. 
A total of ten siblings ranging from the ages of 2 to 18. It’s difficult to enforce the one child policy on the roof of the world, one of the most desolate and hostile environments in the world. Also, religious minorities are allowed to have my children, as a leniency from the People’s Republic of China.

Two sisters sit under a single, bare, fluorescent bulb that lights the room the family of 12 shares for living, eating, and sleeping. 

A total of ten siblings ranging from the ages of 2 to 18. It’s difficult to enforce the one child policy on the roof of the world, one of the most desolate and hostile environments in the world. Also, religious minorities are allowed to have my children, as a leniency from the People’s Republic of China.

April 16, 2014
A young nomad boy poses as his grandmother mixes tsampa on the Tibetan plateau.
Tsampa or Tsamba is a staple food item, particularly prominent in the central part of the region. It is roasted flour, usually barley flour and sometimes also wheat flour. It is usually mixed with the salty Tibetan butter tea.
It’s most often used by nomads, shepherds, and travelers because of the convenience. 
Besides constituting a substantial, arguably predominant part of the Tibetan diet, its prominence also derives from the tradition of throwing pinches of tsampa in the air during many Buddhist rituals. It is believed that tsampa throwing actually predates Buddhist beliefs in the area, originally used as an offering to animistic gods to request their protection. The tradition was consequently incorporated into Buddhism as a “mark of joy and celebration” used at celebratory occasions such as marriages and birthdays. Today it is particularly known in that regard for its use in New Year celebrations, where it is accompanied by chanted verses expressing the desire for good luck in the forthcoming year, for both oneself and others. Tsampa-throwing also occurs at most Buddhist funerals, where the action is intended to release the soul of the deceased.
Tsampa is used in a number of other ways. Mashes of tsampa and cumin are sometimes applied to toothaches or other sore spots.
Tsampa is also known among Tibetan sportsmen for its ability to provide rapid energy boosts; the roasting of the flour breaks it down to an easily digestible state, allowing the calories therein to be quickly incorporated by the body.
Until Friday, April 19th 2014, you can download a free eBook for your iPad or iPhone by visiting: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

A young nomad boy poses as his grandmother mixes tsampa on the Tibetan plateau.

Tsampa or Tsamba is a staple food item, particularly prominent in the central part of the region. It is roasted flour, usually barley flour and sometimes also wheat flour. It is usually mixed with the salty Tibetan butter tea.

It’s most often used by nomads, shepherds, and travelers because of the convenience. 

Besides constituting a substantial, arguably predominant part of the Tibetan diet, its prominence also derives from the tradition of throwing pinches of tsampa in the air during many Buddhist rituals. It is believed that tsampa throwing actually predates Buddhist beliefs in the area, originally used as an offering to animistic gods to request their protection. The tradition was consequently incorporated into Buddhism as a “mark of joy and celebration” used at celebratory occasions such as marriages and birthdays. Today it is particularly known in that regard for its use in New Year celebrations, where it is accompanied by chanted verses expressing the desire for good luck in the forthcoming year, for both oneself and others. Tsampa-throwing also occurs at most Buddhist funerals, where the action is intended to release the soul of the deceased.

Tsampa is used in a number of other ways. Mashes of tsampa and cumin are sometimes applied to toothaches or other sore spots.

Tsampa is also known among Tibetan sportsmen for its ability to provide rapid energy boosts; the roasting of the flour breaks it down to an easily digestible state, allowing the calories therein to be quickly incorporated by the body.

Until Friday, April 19th 2014, you can download a free eBook for your iPad or iPhone by visiting: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

April 15, 2014
Tibetan girl poses, inside the tent used for cooking and food preparation.
If you have an iPhone/iPad/mobile device. There is a free eBook available for download of selected images from Tibet. It’s a free download until Friday, April 18th 2012
Visit: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

Tibetan girl poses, inside the tent used for cooking and food preparation.

If you have an iPhone/iPad/mobile device. There is a free eBook available for download of selected images from Tibet. It’s a free download until Friday, April 18th 2012

Visit: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

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