April 17, 2014
Two sisters sit under a single, bare, fluorescent bulb that lights the room the family of 12 shares for living, eating, and sleeping. 
A total of ten siblings ranging from the ages of 2 to 18. It’s difficult to enforce the one child policy on the roof of the world, one of the most desolate and hostile environments in the world. Also, religious minorities are allowed to have my children, as a leniency from the People’s Republic of China.

Two sisters sit under a single, bare, fluorescent bulb that lights the room the family of 12 shares for living, eating, and sleeping. 

A total of ten siblings ranging from the ages of 2 to 18. It’s difficult to enforce the one child policy on the roof of the world, one of the most desolate and hostile environments in the world. Also, religious minorities are allowed to have my children, as a leniency from the People’s Republic of China.

April 16, 2014
A young nomad boy poses as his grandmother mixes tsampa on the Tibetan plateau.
Tsampa or Tsamba is a staple food item, particularly prominent in the central part of the region. It is roasted flour, usually barley flour and sometimes also wheat flour. It is usually mixed with the salty Tibetan butter tea.
It’s most often used by nomads, shepherds, and travelers because of the convenience. 
Besides constituting a substantial, arguably predominant part of the Tibetan diet, its prominence also derives from the tradition of throwing pinches of tsampa in the air during many Buddhist rituals. It is believed that tsampa throwing actually predates Buddhist beliefs in the area, originally used as an offering to animistic gods to request their protection. The tradition was consequently incorporated into Buddhism as a “mark of joy and celebration” used at celebratory occasions such as marriages and birthdays. Today it is particularly known in that regard for its use in New Year celebrations, where it is accompanied by chanted verses expressing the desire for good luck in the forthcoming year, for both oneself and others. Tsampa-throwing also occurs at most Buddhist funerals, where the action is intended to release the soul of the deceased.
Tsampa is used in a number of other ways. Mashes of tsampa and cumin are sometimes applied to toothaches or other sore spots.
Tsampa is also known among Tibetan sportsmen for its ability to provide rapid energy boosts; the roasting of the flour breaks it down to an easily digestible state, allowing the calories therein to be quickly incorporated by the body.
Until Friday, April 19th 2014, you can download a free eBook for your iPad or iPhone by visiting: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

A young nomad boy poses as his grandmother mixes tsampa on the Tibetan plateau.

Tsampa or Tsamba is a staple food item, particularly prominent in the central part of the region. It is roasted flour, usually barley flour and sometimes also wheat flour. It is usually mixed with the salty Tibetan butter tea.

It’s most often used by nomads, shepherds, and travelers because of the convenience. 

Besides constituting a substantial, arguably predominant part of the Tibetan diet, its prominence also derives from the tradition of throwing pinches of tsampa in the air during many Buddhist rituals. It is believed that tsampa throwing actually predates Buddhist beliefs in the area, originally used as an offering to animistic gods to request their protection. The tradition was consequently incorporated into Buddhism as a “mark of joy and celebration” used at celebratory occasions such as marriages and birthdays. Today it is particularly known in that regard for its use in New Year celebrations, where it is accompanied by chanted verses expressing the desire for good luck in the forthcoming year, for both oneself and others. Tsampa-throwing also occurs at most Buddhist funerals, where the action is intended to release the soul of the deceased.

Tsampa is used in a number of other ways. Mashes of tsampa and cumin are sometimes applied to toothaches or other sore spots.

Tsampa is also known among Tibetan sportsmen for its ability to provide rapid energy boosts; the roasting of the flour breaks it down to an easily digestible state, allowing the calories therein to be quickly incorporated by the body.

Until Friday, April 19th 2014, you can download a free eBook for your iPad or iPhone by visiting: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

April 15, 2014
Tibetan girl poses, inside the tent used for cooking and food preparation.
If you have an iPhone/iPad/mobile device. There is a free eBook available for download of selected images from Tibet. It’s a free download until Friday, April 18th 2012
Visit: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

Tibetan girl poses, inside the tent used for cooking and food preparation.

If you have an iPhone/iPad/mobile device. There is a free eBook available for download of selected images from Tibet. It’s a free download until Friday, April 18th 2012

Visit: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/469448-life-on-the-tibetan-plateau

April 13, 2014
A written piece and published images from Tibet were featured in the annual Brooks Bugle for 2014. You can download, and read the entire article at: http://issuu.com/brooksengland/docs/bugle-2014
www.wandercyclist.com

A written piece and published images from Tibet were featured in the annual Brooks Bugle for 2014. You can download, and read the entire article at: http://issuu.com/brooksengland/docs/bugle-2014

www.wandercyclist.com

April 12, 2014
A circus elephant trainer and his gentle giant, roam up and down a back road of Bangladesh collecting tolls from passing vehicles.

A circus elephant trainer and his gentle giant, roam up and down a back road of Bangladesh collecting tolls from passing vehicles.

April 11, 2014
A young Kyrgyz boy sits in the driver’s seat of his father’s Lada in Nura, Kyrgyzstan. 
An earthquake on October 6, 2008 hit the village, resulting in at least 75 deaths and leveling about 100 buildings. That means this boy was probably just a year or so old during the catastrophe.Statistics state 100 buildings but when I was there I’d be surprised if there were more than 200 people in this small border village in Kyrgyzstan, bordering China.
All the buildings are now new and they have interior heating and some of the best insulated windows I’ve seen in Central Asia. This was funded by NGOs and international aid, which Central Asia is full of, especially their neighbor Tajikistan.
As someone that has been based in China since 2008, I’m always in awe of the dramatic difference when I cross into a border country. The immediate difference and poverty will never cease to shock me.

A young Kyrgyz boy sits in the driver’s seat of his father’s Lada in Nura, Kyrgyzstan. 

An earthquake on October 6, 2008 hit the village, resulting in at least 75 deaths and leveling about 100 buildings. That means this boy was probably just a year or so old during the catastrophe.Statistics state 100 buildings but when I was there I’d be surprised if there were more than 200 people in this small border village in Kyrgyzstan, bordering China.

All the buildings are now new and they have interior heating and some of the best insulated windows I’ve seen in Central Asia. This was funded by NGOs and international aid, which Central Asia is full of, especially their neighbor Tajikistan.

As someone that has been based in China since 2008, I’m always in awe of the dramatic difference when I cross into a border country. The immediate difference and poverty will never cease to shock me.

April 10, 2014
Uyghur Mother and Daughter, Xinjiang 2012
After publishing a book of Tibet, I received countless requests for a collection of Uyghur photos.
After a year of returning from the region and trying to budget a return photo trip, I’v compiled 140 photographs in an eBook. If you’ve been following my feed and work for awhile, you know all profits I make go to continue these projects.
Again, thank all you, specifically the Uyghurs from all around the world that have helped, advised, and supported my endeavor and work.
The book is dedicated to all Uyghurs, specifically Eliyar and Akbar Tursun and their entire family.
Link to purchase the eBook: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/468873-uyghur

Uyghur Mother and Daughter, Xinjiang 2012

After publishing a book of Tibet, I received countless requests for a collection of Uyghur photos.

After a year of returning from the region and trying to budget a return photo trip, I’v compiled 140 photographs in an eBook. If you’ve been following my feed and work for awhile, you know all profits I make go to continue these projects.

Again, thank all you, specifically the Uyghurs from all around the world that have helped, advised, and supported my endeavor and work.

The book is dedicated to all Uyghurs, specifically Eliyar and Akbar Tursun and their entire family.

Link to purchase the eBook: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/468873-uyghur

April 9, 2014
Bangladesh is noted for having some of the worst traffic and road conditions in the world. What is astonishing is that young men risk their life on tractors, on top of buses, hanging off of “people movers” which is like a covered pickup truck, to move around the country. Often to go to work and earn about a $1 a day. I guess it’s true what they say, “desperate measures for desperate times.”
Rarely I saw smiles of the men on these types of autos and it wasn’t until I rolled down a window and showed my face they would flash their beautiful smiles.

Bangladesh is noted for having some of the worst traffic and road conditions in the world. What is astonishing is that young men risk their life on tractors, on top of buses, hanging off of “people movers” which is like a covered pickup truck, to move around the country. Often to go to work and earn about a $1 a day. I guess it’s true what they say, “desperate measures for desperate times.”

Rarely I saw smiles of the men on these types of autos and it wasn’t until I rolled down a window and showed my face they would flash their beautiful smiles.

April 6, 2014
A man weighs garlic and roots at a local market in Bogura, Bangladesh.

A man weighs garlic and roots at a local market in Bogura, Bangladesh.

March 29, 2014
A young girl poses near the banks of the Jamuna river, Bangladesh.

A young girl poses near the banks of the Jamuna river, Bangladesh.

March 25, 2014
A prostitute in Hebei province, China. Curious of the female foreign guest, which is probably the first to ever stay here, she spends time asking questions of simple curiosity.
Recently, China’s security ministry has ordered a crack down on prostitution throughout the mainland. Prostitution can be found from the biggest cities to some of the smallest towns and villages in the far western reaches of China. Officially, prostitution is illegal but up until last month, government officials usually turned their eyes from the matter.
There are seven tiers of prostitution. The first tier are “second wives” which is a very socially and culturally accepted form of “prostitution”. Then downwards from “packaged wife”, “three halls”, “doorbell girls”, “hairdressing salon sister”, “street girl”, to “down the work shack”. This woman would fit more into the “doorbell girl”, forth tier.
From personal experience, there are much less prostitutes in religious areas, such as Tibetans and Uyghurs, but you will find Han women on occasion in these regions.

A prostitute in Hebei province, China. Curious of the female foreign guest, which is probably the first to ever stay here, she spends time asking questions of simple curiosity.

Recently, China’s security ministry has ordered a crack down on prostitution throughout the mainland. Prostitution can be found from the biggest cities to some of the smallest towns and villages in the far western reaches of China. Officially, prostitution is illegal but up until last month, government officials usually turned their eyes from the matter.

There are seven tiers of prostitution. The first tier are “second wives” which is a very socially and culturally accepted form of “prostitution”. Then downwards from “packaged wife”, “three halls”, “doorbell girls”, “hairdressing salon sister”, “street girl”, to “down the work shack”. This woman would fit more into the “doorbell girl”, forth tier.

From personal experience, there are much less prostitutes in religious areas, such as Tibetans and Uyghurs, but you will find Han women on occasion in these regions.

March 24, 2014
The mechanic’s workshop, within the silodrome. The stunt rider’s are also the mechanics. I couldn’t imagine them trusting anyone else with their bikes.

The mechanic’s workshop, within the silodrome. The stunt rider’s are also the mechanics. I couldn’t imagine them trusting anyone else with their bikes.

March 24, 2014
View from inside a silodrome, also known as The Wall of Death.
Spectators in northern Bangladesh await for the show to begin. Men will stunt ride motorbikes, usually 200cc or smaller, on this track. It’s one of the best shows anyone will witness in their lifetime.

View from inside a silodrome, also known as The Wall of Death.

Spectators in northern Bangladesh await for the show to begin. Men will stunt ride motorbikes, usually 200cc or smaller, on this track. It’s one of the best shows anyone will witness in their lifetime.

March 23, 2014
A Uyghur father cracks open apricot shells for the interior seed in his traditional mud packed home in Kashgar. Apricots are one of the most common fruits you will find in Xinjiang and all along the ancient trade route through Central Asia, The Silk Road.

A Uyghur father cracks open apricot shells for the interior seed in his traditional mud packed home in Kashgar. Apricots are one of the most common fruits you will find in Xinjiang and all along the ancient trade route through Central Asia, The Silk Road.

March 23, 2014
Portrait of a brick factory laborer in Bangladesh. These men tend to the kilns, which is one of the most dangerous part of the brick making process. They stand on top of the kiln and continually pour coal into the furnace. These kilns have been known to collapse while the bricks are firing. 

Portrait of a brick factory laborer in Bangladesh. These men tend to the kilns, which is one of the most dangerous part of the brick making process. They stand on top of the kiln and continually pour coal into the furnace. These kilns have been known to collapse while the bricks are firing. 

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